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Moves & Milestones

bridges vol. 9, April 2006 / News from the Network

 

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Alexandra Lerch-Gaggl, molecular biologist and confocal imaging specialist
will assume the position of assistant professor at the Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, in the Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology, and Anatomy. After completing her studies at the Paris-Lodron University in Salzburg, she came to the Medical College as a postdoctoral fellow in 2000 to continue her work in developmental biology.

Dr. Lerch-Gaggl studies the role of factors involved in ribosome biogenesis and nucleologenesis during early development. Recently she has also been appointed director of the Bryant Imaging Core Facility at the Medical College, which offers state-of-the-art imaging techniques, using confocal microscopy, to all faculty and staff of the institution.

Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology and Anatomy at the Medical College of Wisconsin: http://www.mcw.edu/cellbio/


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Re$earch Re$ources

bridges vol. 9, April 2006 / News from the Network
by Caroline Adenberger and Irene Eckart

 

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"We strengthen science and the humanities in Austria," is the corporate policy pledge of the FWF (Austrian Science Fund) , Austria's central body for the promotion of basic research. In so doing, the FWF is equally committed to all branches of science and the humanities and is guided in its operations solely by the standards of the international scientific community.


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Introducing Otto Vogl: Breaking New Ground for Polymer Sciences

by Jutta Kern

Otto Vogl's fluency in German, English, French and Italian and his knowledge of Japanese, Russian and Polish certainly helped to sustain his outreach to the international community in the field of polymer sciences—his strong interest in the arts may have helped to create the notion of a radiant uniqueness that turns persons into personalities.

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Introducing Angelika Amon - Exploring "the Genesis of Life Itself"

bridges vol. 9, April 2006 / News from the Network
by Philipp Steger

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"No," says Angelika Amon, an associate professor of biology at MIT, shaking her head emphatically, "I don't spend much time on grant writing. I am lucky that way." She smiles at the thought of her good fortune and takes another sip from her can of Diet Coke before she continues.

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I note, with a mixture of relief and smug satisfaction, that it's her second Diet Coke within an hour - it's comforting to see that even overachievers like Professor Amon have their little, human vices. After all, one could easily be intimidated by her, considering that one of America's most prominent medical research organizations has for years been willing to bet serious money on this woman having the potential to make significant contributions to science. The organization does this because it "believes that science is facilitated best by providing outstanding researchers with the resources and flexibility to follow their scientific instincts and to pursue new opportunities as soon as they arise." This somewhat unusual approach is not really astonishing, given the visionary power of that organization's founder, one of America's larger-than-life personalities and enduring legends.

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Introducing Andrea Oberhuber: An Austrian's New Sound of Music in French Canada

by Caroline Adenberger

"Finalement, il y a dans la chanson et malgré la standardisation d'aujourd'hui beaucoup plus de femmes intéressantes et marquantes que d'hommes ... surtout marquantes parce que c'est bien de cela dont il s'agit."

"Despite the standards of today, in chanson there are more interesting and striking women than men, particularly striking, because that is what the chanson is all about."

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