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OST Network and ASciNA Activities

The OST network of Austrian scientists abroad was established by the Office of Science & Technology (OST) at the Austrian Embassy in Washington, D.C., and focuses on the outreach of government-related agencies to Austrian scientists in North America. Its main objective has been to support the scientific community with information and specific advice wherever necessary and requested.


{access view=guest}Access to the full article is free, but requires you to register. Registration is simple and quick - all we need is your name and a valid e-mail address. We appreciate your interest in bridges.{/access} {access view=!guest} Encouraged by the OST, an independent association - ASciNA (Austrian Scientists and Scholars in North America) - was founded in 2002 with local chapters being established all over the U.S. and Canada. For further information about ASciNA please visit www.ascina.at.



Network Activities

On March 11, a dinner was held at the residence of Ambassador Dr. Eva Novotny on the occasion of the visit of the Austrian Vice Chancellor Hubert Gorbach to the United States. Several researchers participated in the dinner and discussed with the Vice Chancellor R&D-related issues.

On January 22, the Austrian Undersecretary for Science & Technology Eduard Mainoni visited New York City. On that occasion, the OST organized a dinner with several researchers from the greater New York area. The dinner was followed by a discussion about research in Austria between Undersecretary Mainoni and the participating Austrian researchers.


AScINA Activities

ASciNA Greater Boston
Contact: Eva Schernhammer at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

On February 8, the new board of ASciNA Greater Boston was presented. The new board members are Dr. Eva Schernhammer, Dr. Klaus Podar, and Dr. Christine Mrakotsky.
On that occasion, the Austrian Science Attaché to the United States, Dr. Philipp Steger, paid a visit to the chapter and talked about the OST's activities in the U.S. and Canada.

On March 8, Clemens Foerst, a post-doc in the Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), gave a talk on "Atomic Simulations in Material Sciences."


ASciNA Pennsylvania
Contact: Reinhard Heinisch at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

From October 25 through November 4, the ASciNA chapter in Pennsylvania met with a visiting delegation from the government of Lower Austria.



ASciNA Washington, D.C.
Contact: Ruth Pfeiffer at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The Washington, D.C. Chapter holds regular monthly meetings during which ASciNA members give presentations on their respective fields of research. For exact venue and times contact Ruth Pfeiffer at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

The 2004 ASciNA activities were concluded with a "Stefani Brunch," an Austrian holiday tradition on December 26, followed by a walk through the Seminary at Forest Glen.

In 2005, the ASciNA lecture series was opened on January 25 by Lukas Pezawas, a visiting fellow at the National Institutes of Mental Health, NIH. He gave a lecture on "Imaging Genomics - a tool to visualize genetic effects on brain structure and function."

 On March 1, a lecture entitled "Max F. Perutz - his life and work" was presented at the Austrian Embassy by Dr. Gerhard Pohl of the Austrian Chemical Society in Vienna. The lecture was organized by the OST with support from ASciNA. During his lecture, Professor Pohl discussed how research results from Max Perutz's work influenced groundbreaking developments in modern molecular biology and eventually garnered Dr. Perutz a Nobel Prize in Chemistry (1962). Professor Pohl also provided insight into the private life of Dr. Perutz along with personal photographs. After the lecture, refreshments were served and all the guests had the opportunity to network. [picture (from left): William A. Eaton, NIH with lecturer Gerhard Pohl and Sabine Thonke, OST]{/access}

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